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Thursday, February 28, 2013

Weekend Estate Sales: 2/28/13 - 3/3/13


WEEKEND ESTATE SALES
Click on each link for more information on the estate sale!
Find something neat at an estate sale? Let us know!
Hosting an estate sale? Send me an e-mail to be featured in our weekly post!
Be the first to know about these sales on Facebook!


Antique Furniture & Sterling Silver
Short Hills, NJ 07078
9:30 am - 3:00 pm
Friday & Saturday (Same Time)


Fine Antiques!
Tinton Falls, NJ 07712
9:30 am - 3:00 pm
Friday & Saturday (Same Time)


Antique Furniture, Clocks, & Dolls
Morristown, NJ 07960
10:00 am - 2:00 pm
Friday, Saturday & Sunday (Same Time)


Wedgewood Collection
Chatham, NJ 07928
10:00 am - 2:00 pm
Friday & Saturday (Same Time)


18th Century Furniture
Holmdel, NJ 07733
10:00 am - 4:00 pm
Friday & Saturday (Same Time)

Find more Estate Sales near you at estatesales.net

Wednesday, February 27, 2013

The Massacre at Hancock's Bridge

The Massacre at Hancock's Bridge
Written by NJ Historian

A few miles south of the City of Salem, far from major highways and tucked away from suburban sprawl, is a small village known as Hancock's Bridge. In this hamlet exists a unique patterned brick home, which in addition to its fascinating architectural style, was a site of tragedy during the American Revolution. Standing for over 275 years, the Hancock House remains a memorial to the militia men that perished during a surprise attack by the British on the morning of March 21, 1778.

The landscape of Salem and Burlington Counties is dotted with patterned brick houses, of which the Hancock House is a fine example. Salem County has the second largest concentration and variety of patterned brick houses after Burlington County, and in the nation. These homes were often built by the wealthy and comprised approximately one-tenth of the late eighteenth-century homes in Salem County. Their construction is modeled after seventeenth century English Quaker traditional building methods. Masons used variations in the color and placement of bricks to create designs, dates, and initials in the exterior walls of the house.


The Hancock House sits on property that was purchased from John Fenwick in 1675 by William Hancock, an English shoemaker. Records indicate that William Hancock's owned 968 acres in Alloways Creek, sixteen acres in New Salem and sixteen acres at Cohanzick, the site of the current day Greenwich in Cumberland County. Upon his death, the property passed to his wife Isabella and nephew, John Hancock. Isabella soon sold 500 acres to a man named John Maddox; the rest she left to her nephew. John who was to work for another colonist named Wade for nine years to finally obtain his inheritance.

John’s inheritance of approximately 500 acres made him a major landholder in Fenwick’s Colony. He contributed to the development of the area by building a bridge across Alloways Creek in 1708. The bridge was named “Hancocks Bridge,” and it allowed passage on the highway between Salem and Greenwich. The bridge also accounts for the settlement's name. When John Hancock died in 1709, he willed his property to his son William. William became a Justice of the Peace for Salem County in 1727 and served in the Colonial Assembly for twenty years. 

In 1734, William and his wife Sarah built the Hancock House. The masons who constructed it alternated red bricks laid length-wise, called stretchers, with blue glazed bricks laid on end, referred to as headers. The result was a checker-board type design called Flemish bond. The masons used a similar method to create the herringbone design on the gable end walls. On the exterior western wall of the Hancock House, Willian and Sarah Hancock installed their initials [HWS] and the construction date [1734] in the brickwork.


The main block of the house is two stories tall and three bays with a door positioned in the center. A smaller, one story, two bay wing is located on the eastern side of the building and may have operated as a tavern during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, as some evidence suggests. Other elements of the English Quaker-inspired architecture includes a pent-roof that wraps around the front and back of the house; simple porch steps; interior paneling; and the use of local materials such as Wistarburg glass. On a few exterior bricks of the home, initials of the brick-makers have been etched directly into the stone. Examples include "SH" and "EM."

Upon William Hancock's death in 1762, his home was willed to his son William, who succeeded him in the Assembly and became His Majesty’s Judge of the County Court for the holding of Pleas for the County of Salem.

Hancock's bridge was a strategic transportation route for the American colonies. It was used by the Continentals to move cattle and provisions to General Washington at Valley Forge from the fertile lands of southern New Jersey. The British troops headquartered in Philadelphia had learned about the fertile lands and livestock of southern New Jersey and that they would find little resistance. The British moved into the City of Salem on March 18, 1778. A small skirmish, known as the Battle of Quinton's Bridge was fought, in which companies of the New Jersey militia were lured into a trap by British Lieutenant Colonel Charles Mawhood and suffered significant casualties.

The American forces were able to hold the south side of Aloes (Alloways) Creek, where most of the livestock and supplies had been moved. At all of the bridge crossing in Cumberland and Salem Counties, the British were met by resistance and turned back. Frustrated, Colonel Mawhood was determined to obtain the supplies and "chastise the rebels."


Colonel Mawhood chose the area surrounding Hancock's Bridge as his next area to infiltrate. In order to prevent the British from advancing, the local militia removed the planks from the bridge. On March 20, 1778, Mawhood issued the following mandate to his British troops: “Go - spare no one - put all to death - give no quarters.” The British, decided to attack from the south, going by boat to an inlet about seven miles south of Aloes Creek and crossed the meadows to surprise the Quaker garrison numbering about thirty men at Hancock's Bridge. With local Tories and their slaves acting as guides, Major John Graves Simcoe and approximately 300 troops attacked the Hancock House which Judge Hancock allowed the local militia to use as barracks. Major Simcoe relaid the bridge planks and joined forces with Lt. Colonel Mitchell, who had waited all night on the north side of the bridge-less creek. At approximately five o’clock in the morning of March 21, 1778, Mahwood's orders were carried out. Attacking from the front and rear, everyone inside the Hancock House was bayoneted. Not a shot was fired during the massacre. Among the ten killed and five wounded was Judge William Hancock, who had unexpectedly returned home that evening from Salem. He was carried to the nearby home of Joseph Ware. He died several days later. It was quite an unfortunate stroke of luck for Judge Hancock, as he had been known to be a staunch supporter of the crown and was a non-violent Quaker.

The Hancock House remained in the family until 1848, although the extent to which the house was used as a private residence and the property farmed is uncertain. The house was transferred to four other owners between 1848 and 1931. There is evidence to suggest a section of the house was leased for use as a tavern during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. In 1931, the State of New Jersey acquired the Hancock House for $4,000 and opened it as a museum in 1932. The house was fully restored beginning in 1976. Four years later, in 1979, the home reopened, complete with new mechanical systems and air conditioning. In 1991, due to budget constraints, the house was closed to the public.

Hancock House interior, October 1941. Source: HABS
In 1996, the NJ Division of Parks & Forestry began a series of improvements to the house, including a new cedar shingle roof, repairs to the window sills, removal of a 1970s kitchen shed, interior plaster repairs, site and access improvements, a security system, and exterior lighting. On March 21, 1998, the Hancock House finally reopened to the public on the 220th anniversary of the massacre, a living memorial to those who perished that morning in 1778.


The Swedish Plank Cabin
To the east of the Hancock House is a small wooden cabin. This cabin, although partly a reconstruction, demonstrates some of the earliest housing stock that was once found in the Swedish colony in southern New Jersey. The cabin contains a single room  and is a rare remaining example of handhewn, white cedar plank construction. The cabin contains glazed windows, which is more elaborate than those typically constructed in the seventeenth-century, but as time evolved, so did the amenities that the cabin provided to its occupants.

The Swedish Plank Cabin, April 1936. Source: HABS
The cabin was originally located on the property of John Tyler on Salem-Hancocks Bridge Road in Salem. The structure has been standing since at least 1701, when William Tyler, an immigrant to Salem County in 1688, made his will. The cabin was moved to the Hancock House property and rebuilt in 1931 by the Civil Works Administration. The cabin was moved once again 1975 from the rear to the side of the Hancock property and converted into restrooms. In the 1990s, those changes were reversed and the building restored to its former glory.

The cabin’s construction follows the traditional building techniques of the seventeenth-century, with four-inch thick side planks, dovetailed corners, a fireplace and wooden pins instead of nails. The woodwork on either side of the fireplace came from two local Salem County houses: the Abel Nicholson House (1722) and the John Oakford House (1764).

Known as stugar, which translates to “room inside,” cabins such as this one, were built in small clusters or stood alone, depending on the size of the farm. Swedish settlers established small communities throughout Salem County, clearing only enough land to farm.



Additional photos of my trip to the Hancock House on Pinterest

For More Information:

Monday, February 25, 2013

Organization of the Week: The Friends of the Hancock House


Every Monday, I highlight a non-profit related to history or the arts, a historical society, preservation group or friends group whose main objective is to promote the historical and artistic history of New Jersey.

This week, I am featuring the Friends of the Hancock House. The Friends of the Hancock House is a non-profit organization which works with the State of New Jersey to promote and educate the community about the William H. Hancock House located in Lower Alloways Creek Township, Salem County New Jersey. For almost twenty years, the Friends have been sponsoring an annual reenactment of the massacre that took place in the house on March 21, 1778. The group also opens the house for special events, including a Civil War weekend each April, Salem County historic house tours, and other fundraising events to supplement and support the continued preservation and interpretation of this unique eighteenth century home.

The Friends of the Hancock House rely on memberships, fundraising, and countless volunteers to continue its mission. For more information on programs, special events, and exhibits hosted by the Friends of the Hancock House or to become a member or volunteer, please visit www.fohh.20fr.com or call 856-935-4373.

If you are a member of a non-profit organization or know of one that you would like to see featured on this site, please let us know in the comments or send an e-mail to kelly@thehistorygirl.com.


Sunday, February 24, 2013

eBay Items of the Week: 2/24/13 - 3/3/13

Items up on eBay this week!
Click on each link for the eBay page!
More items always going up.
Stay updated about new items on Facebook.

Have you seen something in the past not listed this week?
Ask me and I'll let you know if it's still available.



Vintage Pamphlet



 Perth Amboy Savings Institution
1968 Pocket Calendar and 2 Shoe Horns


Savings Institution Bank Envelope


From September 1968


Old Bridge, NJ

Check out more Antique Books, Bottles, Ephemera, & Tins.

Friday, February 22, 2013

Weekend Historical Happenings: 2/23/13 - 2/24/13


WEEKEND HISTORICAL HAPPENINGS
Know about a historical event happening in your area? 
Send me an email to let us know!
Be the first to find out about these events on Facebook!



Saturday, February 23 - Morristown, Morris County
What is it Henry?

The Wick Family owned some curious tools, with some odd names. Could you use a beetle or a stylyard around your house? Come discover these and other items Mr. Wick used everyday at his home in Morristown. The program will run from 1:30 -  3:30 pm at the Wick House in Jockey Hollow, located within Morristown National Historical Park. Free admission. www.nps.gov/morr

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Saturday, February 23 - Port Norris, Cumberland County
Winter Enrichment Series

A winter learning experience for ages 6 - 12 held each Saturday from 9:00 am - 12:00 noon at the Bivalve Shipping Sheds at 2800 High Street, Port Norris, NJ. Explore winter on the Delaware Bay: discover the bay's winter inhabitants and environment with hands on activities, wetland walks, critter observations, art and crafts. This program runs every Saturday until February 23. For more information or to register, contact Laura S. Johnson, ljohnson@bayshorediscovery.org; 856-785-2060 ext. 102. www.bayshorediscovery.org

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Saturday, February 23 - Southampton, Burlington County
Winter Botany in the Pines

Russell Juelg of the New Jersey Conservation Foundation will lead an indoor winter botany workshop at the Pinelands Preservation Alliance Headquarters in Southampton.

After lunch head out to the Franklin Parker Preserve for some field studies. Cost is $20 per person. For more information or to register online, visit www.pinelandsalliance.org/exploration/winterbotany. The Pinelands Preservation Alliance is located at 17 Pemberton Rd, Southampton, NJ. Call 609-859-8860 or visit www.pinelandsalliance.org.

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Saturday, February 23 - Rutherford, Bergen County
Chocolate Tasting and Tour

The Meadowlands Museum invites you to a Chocolate Tasting and Tour on Saturday evening between 7:00 and 9:30 pm. For a $25 (adults) donation to the museum, you can have a glass of champagne (or water or sparkling juice) and then wander from room to room to see the progress of the museum, its current and upcoming exhibits, and best of all EAT CHOCOLATE! You do not need to call or make reservations. Just come to the museum that evening and enter at the lower level. The Meadowlands Museum is located at 91 Crane Avenue, Rutherford, NJ. For more information call 201-935 1175 or visit www.meadowlandsmuseum.com.

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Saturday, February 23 - Fort Lee, Bergen County
Voices of the Revolution

On Saturday afternoon the New Jersey Section of the Palisades Interstate Park will host an illustrated lecture and book signing with two authors who have made a specialty of uncovering the hidden history of the American Revolution as seen through the eyes of the common soldiers who lived and fought through that tumultuous time. The program, called “Voices of the Revolution,” will be co-sponsored with the Fort Lee Historical Society and held at the Visitor Center of the Interstate Park’s Fort Lee Historic Park facility. The program is free. The Historical Society will provide donuts and coffee for the event, which will take place from 2:00 - 4:00 pm. For more information about the program as well as directions to Fort Lee Historic Park, please call Fort Lee Historic Park at 201-461-1776. www.njpalisades.org/013_voices-revolution.htm

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Saturday - Sunday, February 23 - 24 - Trenton, Mercer County
3 Centuries of African American Soldiers 

America We Served! Black History comes to life at the Old Barracks Museum! Experience the living history of America's Black Warriors by the veterans themselves and dedicated re-enactors. View displays of photos, literature and artifacts from wars past. Talk to the storytellers of America's black men and women at war.


Join the Old Barracks Museum on Saturday to meet James M. Paradis, author of Strike the Blow for Freedom: The 6th United States Colored Infantry in the Civil War and African Americans and the Gettysburg Campaign. Mr. Paradis will have a book signing of African Americans and the Gettysburg Campaign. The book may be purchased in the Barracks gift shop.

On Sunday meet Joseph Seliga, author of The Search for Camp Olden, Hamilton Township. He will share his knowledge of the African American soldier in the Civil War. Don't miss this wonderful educational experience for the entire family! The Revolutionary War will be represented by the predominately African American Rhode Island Regiment. The Civil War will be represented by the 6th Regiment United States Colored Troops. World War II will be represented by The 5th Platoon. Other authentically kitted out re-enactors will represent the War of 1812, the Buffalo Soldiers of the American West, and the Harlem Hellfighters of World War I fame.

Admission: Adults $4, Seniors $2, Children $2, under 6 years-free, Family Rate $8. Old Barracks Association Members are free. The event runs from 10:00 am - 5:00 pm each day. All African American history/studies books are 10% off in the Barracks Gift Shop. Three Centuries of African American Soldiers is presented by the Trenton Historical Society and the Old Barracks Museum. www.barracks.org

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Sunday, February 24 - Bordentown, Burlington County
Meet George Washington

General Washington has never been to Bordentown...until now, of course. On Sunday from 2:00 - 4:00 pm, first-person interpreter Sam Davis of Chesterfield will bring George Washington to the 1740 Friends Meeting House at 302 Farnsworth Avenue to greet the good citizens and patriots of Bordentown and to answer any questions about his personal life and, more importantly, about the Battles of Trenton which the General successfully led when he was only 44 years old. Visitors of any age are welcome to sit with His Excellency and talk over the "times that try men's souls" as Thomas Paine put it. This is a free program and a good photo opportunity for the kids sponsored by the Bordentown Historical Society as part of its 2013 educational series. For more information call 609 298-3779. www.bordentownhistory.org

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Sunday, February 24 - Rocky Hill, Somerset County
Washington's Birthday Celebration

Do you know where George Washington was born? Or what his first job was? Or even what political party he belonged to What important innovation did he introduce into American farming? Rockingham Historic Site will celebrate Washington's 281st birthday on Sunday from 12:00 noon - 4:00 pm. Using the various rooms of the historic house to set the scenes, the tours will move through the stages of Washington's life with trivia questions added in for those partaking of the tours. You will even get to "meet" the general in the form of a life-size mannequin in an exact, hand-sewn replica of his last uniform as Commander in Chief of the Continental Army. Washington stayed at Rockingham, the farm property of the late Judge John Berrien, from late August to early November in 1783, and it became his final wartime headquarters when the Treaty of Paris was formally signed while he was in residence there.

The special-event tours, which emphasize details of Washington's life and are not the regular history tour of the house, will be offered between 12:00 noon and 4:00 pm (last tour at 3:00) with refreshments served after each tour. Tour size is limited, and reservations are required.  Please call 609-683-7132 for reservations.

Rockingham is located on Rte. 603 (Laurel Ave./Kingston-Rocky Hill Rd.), one mile north of Rte. 27 in Kingston and one mile south of Rte. 518 in Rocky Hill. www.rockingham.net

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Sunday, February 24 - Freehold, Monmouth County
How the Suburbs Ended the Civil Rights Movement in New Jersey

As part of its "Historically Speaking" lecture series, the Monmouth County Historical Association is pleased to welcome back Dr. Walter Greason who will speak on Sunday from 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm. The lecture, entitled "Suburban Erasure: How the Suburbs Ended the Civil Rights Movement in New Jersey," will be held at the Court Street School at 140 Court Street in Freehold at the corner of Rhea (parking lot entrance on Avenue A).

Dr. Greason is the executive director of the International Center for Metropolitan Growth. For the last twenty years, he has established himself as the world's leading authority on the economics of race and metropolitan growth and has advised hundreds of businesses and organizations on fiscal management, investment, and development strategies. He also currently serves as the treasurer of the Society for American City and Regional Planning History (www.sacrph.org) and is an officer on the Membership Committee of the Organization of American Historians. Recently, Dr. Greason won recognition as a Visiting Scholar at James Madison University in Virginia and his new book "Suburban Erasure" is available now and will on hand for purchase and signing at the lecture. Dr. Greason is Assistant Professor of History and Coordinator of the African American and Africana Studies Program at Ursinus College in Pennsylvania. He is also the author of "The Path to Freedom - Black Families in New Jersey."

The Court Street School is one of the principal structures associated with the segregated history of early 20th century education in Freehold. The original school was organized in 1915 in a one-room wooden building, exclusively for the education of African American children. The existing brick building was constructed in two phases in 1920 and 1926. All African-American children in Freehold were educated here from kindergarten through 8th grade until WWII when it was used as an air raid shelter and ration station. It was reopened as an integrated school for kindergarten through 3rd grade in 1949, until it closed in 1974. It became a community education and historical center in 1990 and was placed on the National Register of Historic Sites in 1995.

The lecture is presented in partnership with the Court Street School and is part of a weekend long celebration entitled Africa to America hosted by the Court Street School Education Community Center.

Dr. Greason's lecture is open to the public and admission is free. Refreshments will be served.  Please call 732-462-1466 for further information or to let us know you will attend. For more information, call 732-462-1466 x16 or visit www.monmouthhistory.org.

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Sunday, February 24 - Morristown, Morris County
Annual Membership Tea

The Morris County Historical Society will hold its annual  President's Membership Tea on Sunday from 1:00 - 4:00 pm at Acorn Hall in Morristown. The day's admission fee ($6 for adults, $5 for seniors, $3 for students) includes a tour of the 19th century house museum; the exhibit "Inspiring Woman: Celebrating Women Artists of Morris County," and a delicious afternoon tea buffet with light tea sandwiches and desserts served in Acorn Hall's dining room. The event is free for society members, and the admission fee can be applied towards an annual membership in MCHS. No advance reservation is required.

The President's Membership Tea is held each year to provide the public with the opportunity to learn more about the Morris County Historical Society and the benefits of society membership. It also gives current members a chance to meet one another, as well as MCHS president, board, and staff. Current members are encouraged to bring a friend who may be interested in joining the society.

The Morris County Historical Society, founded in 1946, is a member-supported, 501 (c) 3non-profit organization. Its headquarters, Acorn Hall, 68 Morris Avenue in Morristown, is an 1853 Italianate Villa mansion open to the public on Mondays and Thursdays (11:00 am - 4:00 pm), and Sundays (1:00 pm - 4:00 pm). For more information, call 973-267-3465 or visit www.acornhall.org.

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Sunday, February 24 - Kenilworth, Union County
"What is Soul Food?"

The history and significance of "Soul Food," the variety of cuisine traditionally popular in African-American culture, will be the focus of a Black History Month Celebration being hosted by the Kenilworth Historical Society on Sunday afternoon. The general public is invited to attend the event, which will take place at the Kenilworth Seniors' Center located at 526 Boulevard, Kenilworth, NJ. Light refreshments will be served starting at 1:30 pm, and the program will begin at 2:30 pm. Admission is free. In case of snow, the celebration will be held on March 3, 2013.

The featured presentation, "What is Soul Food?" is appropriate for all age groups. It will be given by Dr. Fannie L. Gordon, an instructor for the "Today's Table Classes for Contemporary Cooks" culinary program at Middlesex County College in Edison. Dr. Gordon will discuss how "soul food" evolved from African-American cultural influences, traditions and necessity. She also will relate the various ways in which African-Americans view food, its preparation, its health aspects and its significant value in bringing families together.

Some participants in the program will be wearing traditional African attire in celebration of their African-American heritage. Any other attendees wishing to enhance the event in that manner are welcome to do so.

Parking and the entrance to the Kenilworth Seniors' Center are located at the rear of the building. For additional information, please call 908-709-0434. The Kenilworth Historical Society is an independent, non-profit, tax-exempt organization dedicated to the research, preservation and interpretation of the historic Oswald J. Nitschke House, local history and culture. www.kenilworthhistoricalsociety.org

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Sunday, February 24 - Cranford, Union County
"Scherenschnitte: The Art of Paper Cutting"

Come stop by the Crane-Phillips House Museum on Sunday to learn about "Scherenschnitte, the Art of Paper Cutting." The museum opens at 2:00 pm. The program will begin at 2:15 pm. Scherenschnitte, which means "scissor cuts" in German, is the art of paper cutting. The artwork often has symmetry within the design, and common forms include silhouettes, valentines, and love letters. The art tradition was founded in Switzerland and Germany in the 16th century and was brought to Colonial America in the 18th century by immigrants who settled primarily in Pennsylvania. This program is appropriate for families.

Admission is free but reservations are required. The Crane-Phillips House is located at 124 North Union Avenue in Cranford. For further information, please call 908-276-0082 or e-mail cranfordhistoricalsociety@verizon.net. www.cranfordhistoricalsociety.com

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Sunday, February 24 - Lawrenceville, Mercer County
Annual Meeting of the Lawrence Historical Society 

Join the Lawrence Historical Society for their annual meeting at Lawrence High School at 2:00 pm on Sunday. Dennis Waters and Michael Siegel will use maps, site plans, and related materials to illustrate how Lawrence underwent a profound transformation from sleepy farming community to suburb during the 20th century in their presentation entitled "The Street Where You Live: How Lawrence Became a Suburb 1900-2000." Refreshments will be served after the meeting. The Lawrence High School is located at 2525 Princeton Pike, Lawrenceville, NJ.

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Sundays through April 14, 2013 - Cranbury, Middlesex County
Bunting Doll House on Display

The Bunting Doll House is on display at the Cranbury Museum on Sundays from 1:00 - 4:00 pm  through April 14, 2013. The house is a hand-made replica of an 1890's house and veterinarian's office in Burlington, N.J. When Lavada Bunting needed to relax after her long days as a private duty nurse in the 1950s, she turned to an all-consuming hobby, creating a dollhouse and the miniature furniture for it. The endeavor was nine years in the making. Thanks to Lavada Bunting's efforts, her descendants have a family heirloom: an elaborately furnished, nine-room, two-story replica of a Colonial house. The creator's nephew Bill Bunting, a Cranbury resident and Princeton lawyer, said, "It's an idealized version of the house in Burlington, NJ where my aunt grew up. No one has ever played with it.  It's not that kind of house." He has loaned the Cranbury Historical and Preservation Society this family treasure. The Cranbury Museum is located at 4 Park Place East, Cranbury. www.cranburyhistory.org

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Through April 28, 2013 - Paterson, Passaic County
New Exhibit at Lambert Castle

Lambert Castle, the Victorian-era mansion located on the Garrett Mountain Reservation on the border between Paterson and Clifton, will be home to an exciting new art exhibit now through April 28, 2013. The exhibit, entitled "Message in a Bottle: The Bottleworks of Dr. Etta Ehrlich," will feature Dr. Ehrlich's unique and thought-provoking take on society and culture, using carefully-arranged antique bottles and other found objects. The exhibit will be open until April 28 during regular museum hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 1:00 to 4:00 pm. Lambert Castle is located at 3 Valley Road, Paterson. For more information, call 973-247-0085 or visit www.lambertcastle.org.

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Some event listings courtesy of the League of Historical Societies of New Jersey

Thursday, February 21, 2013

Weekend Estate Sales: 2/22/13 - 2/24/13



WEEKEND ESTATE SALES
Click on each link for more information on the estate sale!
Find something neat at an estate sale? Let us know!
Hosting an estate sale? Send me an e-mail to be featured in our weekly post!
Be the first to know about these sales on Facebook!


LOADED with Antiques
Ocean City, NJ 08226
9:00 am - 4:00 pm
Friday & Saturday (Same Time)


Trunks, Camera, Clocks!
Closter, NJ 07624
10:00 am - 4:00 pm Friday
11:00 am - 3:00 pm Saturday
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm Sunday


Antique Furniture & Toys
Rutherford, NJ 07070
9:00 am - 5:00 pm
Friday, Saturday & Sunday (Same Time)


Fine Art
Livingston, NJ 07039
9:30 am - 3:00 pm
Friday & Saturday (Same Time)


Antique Furniture
Jersey City, NJ 07305
9:30 am - 3:00 pm
Friday & Saturday (Same Time)



Unique Antiques
Westfield, NJ 07090
10:00 am - 5:00 pm
Friday & Saturday (Same Time)

Find more Estate Sales near you at estatesales.net

Wednesday, February 20, 2013

Before West Point: Pluckemin and the Jacobus Vanderveer House

Before West Point: Pluckemin and the Jacobus Vanderveer House
Written by NJ Historian

The State of New Jersey was host to many generals and officials during the Revolutionary War. In the Raritan Valley, five generals and their staff strategically established headquarters in the homes of the well-to-do and those supporting the cause. In Bedminster, General Henry Knox took up residence in the home of Jacobus Vanderveer. Not far from the house, Knox established the first military training academy of its kind in the United States, enabling him to properly train the American forces in the art of artillery, preparing them for battle. 


The Vanderveer family settled in the Raritan Valley in 1743 when Jacobus Vanderveer, Sr. and his wife Catherine Unk purchased land along the east and west side of the North Branch of the Raritan River from Daniel Axtell and Lewis Johnston. Shortly after purchasing the land, Jacobus Vanderveer, Jr. was the first member of the family to be born in the Valley that same year. His parents were part of a tight-knit Dutch community centered around the Dutch Reformed Church, which maintained strong ties to their Dutch heritage and traditions. The Vanderveers resented the British and supported the Continental cause since the British had taken over the New Amsterdam Colony in 1664.

About 1745, Jacobus Vanderveer, Sr. built a home for his family on the east side of the river. By the late 1750s he had built a grist and saw mill along the river as well. In 1759, Jacobus Vanderveer, Sr. died and the property was willed to his son, Jacobus Vanderveer, Jr. Sometime between 1772 and 1775, Jacobus Vanderveer, Jr. constructed a new home on the property for his wife, Winche. His wife and their only child, Catherine, died in 1777, leaving Jacobus alone in his new home.

The original footprint of the Vanderveer House consisted of a one-and-a-half story, three bay, frame structure with a kitchen wing attached to the west end. The house was two rooms deep and included two fireplaces, both of which exist today. The current hallway was divided into two rooms, still evident by the direction of the floorboards and the exposed wall which shows where walls once existed. The front door was located on the south side of the home, to take advantage of the full sun and light in the winter.

The original 1770s parlor with fireplace and cabinet.
During the winter of 1778-1779, General Henry Knox took residence in the Vanderveer House with his wife Lucy and their daughter "Little" Lucy. Lucy was in the late stages of pregnancy while at the Vanderveer House and gave birth to a daughter named Julia, who died shortly after birth. She was one of nine children that did not survive to adulthood. Julia's death caused a commotion in the Dutch Reform Church, which refused to bury her in the church's cemetery because their family was not a member of the church. Additionally, the clergy felt that it was possible she may have been possessed by a demon. According to local tradition, she was buried on grounds donated by Jacobus Vanderveer where he buried his own infant daughter just two years prior. The land where these children are buried are now part of the cemetery to the north of the Vanderveer property.

While at the Vanderveer House, General Knox supervised the establishment of the Pluckemin Catonment, a military training academy. The Cantonment was located to the south and east of the Vanderveer House. The facility was E-shaped, and served three purposes: housing the artillery troops and officers and camp followers, creating new weapons to resupply Washington's army, and training the artillery forces. A large building at the center of the "E" was used as a classroom, providing classes to officers each day on the techniques and details of using new weapons and ordnance. The Cantonment was America’s first military training facility, precursor to the US Military Academy at West Point, established in 1802.

Pluckemin Cantonment as drawn in 1778 by John Lillie. Source: www.jvanderveerhouse.com
After the winter of 1779, the buildings remained in use as a military hospital into 1780. There is no evidence of the buildings being used after that and most likely fell victim to neglect and were slowly regained by nature. It was not until the 1970s that the site was rediscovered when a history student wrote a master's thesis about General Knox and the Continental Army’s winter cantonment at Pluckemin. The thesis sparked an interest in the site and over the course of ten years (1979-1989), an archaeology project was coordinated that yielded over 190,000 objects. Roughly 19,000 of the archaeological finds are currently in the process of being cataloged through a grant from Somerset County. The Pluckemin Artillery Cantonment was added to the State and National Registers of Historic Places in  2008 and 2009, respectively.

After the Revolution, Jacobus married Maria Hardenburgh, the daughter of a prominent clergyman of the Dutch Reformed Church. Together they had three children that survived to adulthood: Henry, Dinah, and Phebe. After Jacobus' death in 1810 at the age of 66, the house was inherited by Henry S. Vanderveer, his son. At the time, Henry was 23. About the same time, he married Francis Nesbitt and began building an addition on the east side of the property. The addition consisted of two rooms built in the Federal Style, reflecting how the Vanderveers had assimilated themselves in American culture and shied away from their ancestral Dutch traditions. However, Henry never saw the rooms completed. He died in 1813, only three years after inheriting his father's estate. His widow and young daughter Maria left the property and never returned. The inventory of Henry's estate included five enslaved workers; a man, woman, and three children. They may have been a family although no records currently exist that verify this. It was not uncommon for the Dutch to own slaves. Documents indicate that even Jacobus Vanderveer inherited one slave named June from his father's estate. During his lifetime, he may have had as many as six slaves at one time. In his will, he left two slaves to his granddaughters.

1813 Federal style addition.
Between 1830 and 1832, Margaret Mellick and her husband Abram Huff rented the property. In 1833, Mary Hardenburg Vanderveer sold the property to Dr. Henry Vanderveer. After Dr. Henry Vanderveer's death in 1868, his will was disputed and by 1875 his property was sold at auction. During the dispute, it appears that Israel Schenck, one of Dr. Vanderveer's nephews, had been in charge of and rented out the property. 

In 1875, Henry Ludlow purchased the property at auction. Henry and his wife Augusta, along with two wards and two servants lived in the house. The Ludlow's farmed roughly 120 acres of land surrounding the house. The Ludlow's made one very significant change to the house circa 1875. The original 1770s kitchen wing on the north end of the house was removed for reasons unknown. Historians conjecture that it may have been extremely dilapidated or it may have suffered some significant damage late in the nineteenth century.  A new wing was built in its place and divided into four rooms. At the same time, a new porch spanning three bays was added to the southern entrance to the home.

In 1909, the house was sold to Frank A. and Frederick E. Ballentine, who were known to be involved in real estate. The Ballantines dramatically changed the home and made many improvements, perhaps in the hope of reselling the home for a profit. Stucco was applied to the exterior and a large porch with square columns and a porte cochere was added to the north side of the house, essentially relocating the front entrance from the south side to the north side. The current stairwell in the home was also built, replacing the earlier staircase at the former front entrance. During this time, plumbing was added to the house, steam heat installed, new windows were installed, and dormers were built on the second floor. On March 21, 1916, the home was sold once again to Grant B. Schley, who died one year later. After his death, the property passes to his son, Kenneth B. Schley, Sr. Kenneth B. Schley, Jr. retained ownership of the home and rented it to various tenants through the 1980s.

The Vanderveer House as it appeared in 1989, prior to restoration. Source: www.jvanderveerhouse.com
The Vanderveer property was purchased by Bedminster Township in 1989. The house was placed on the National and New Jersey Registers of Historic Places in 1995. A large-scale restoration project began around 2000 to transform this once-important home back into the Dutch and Federal-style home that once existed. The stucco, dormers, and porches were removed, windows and doors were replaced and relocated to their original fenestration, the original roofline was rebuilt, and the original floors were uncovered. In 2007, the 1770 kitchen wing was reconstructed over the original footprint. Today, the kitchen wing serves as an orientation and welcome area to the house, providing for handicap access to the rest of the structure.

There are a long lists of "firsts" for New Jersey, but many sources neglect to mention the Puckemin Catonment, America's first military training academy. Despite the Vanderveer House being the only remaining building associated with the site, over 190,000 artifacts have been uncovered, demonstrating the importance and the countless possibilities for interpretation and display. The continued preservation of the simple, yet elegant Dutch house where Knox and his family resided, and the renewed interest in the training academy he commanded, would make General Henry Knox proud as he reflected upon his accomplishments during the Revolutionary War.


Additional photos of my trip to the Jacobus Vanderveer House on Pinterest

For More Information:

Monday, February 18, 2013

Organization of the Week: Friends of Jacobus Vanderveer House


Every Monday, I highlight a non-profit related to history or the arts, a historical society, preservation group or friends group whose main objective is to promote the historical and artistic history of New Jersey.

This week, I am featuring the Friends of the Jacobus Vanderveer House. Established in 1998, the mission of the Friends of the Jacobus Vanderveer House is to restore, develop, and operate the Vanderveer House property, significant in United States military history, as a nationally important historic site and an educational and community resource. The Vanderveer House served as headquarters for General Henry Knox during the winter of 1778-1779, when the Continental Army artillery was located in the village of Pluckemin during the Revolutionary War's Second Middlebrook Encampment. The house is the only known building still standing that was associated with the Pluckemin Artillery Cantonment. Plans for the restored house call for establishing a museum for exhibiting artifacts from the Pluckemin encampment and featuring programs related to the history of the American Revolution. Interpretive exhibits will be designed for the site. The Friends have conducted several research projects in the past, including a recent document for museum interpretation of contexts and themes for exhibits and displays.

The Friends of the Jacobus Vanderveer House relies on memberships, fundraising, and countless volunteers to continue its mission. For more information on programs, special events, and exhibits hosted by the Friends of the Jacobus Vanderveer House or to become a member or volunteer, please visit www.jvanderveerhouse.com or call 908-212-7000 ext. 611.

If you are a member of a non-profit organization or know of one that you would like to see featured on this site, please let us know in the comments or send an e-mail to kelly@thehistorygirl.com.


Sunday, February 17, 2013

eBay Items of the Week: 2/17/13 - 2/24/13


Items up on eBay this week!
Click on each link for the eBay page!
More items always going up.
Stay updated about new items on Facebook.

Have you seen something in the past not listed this week?
Ask me and I'll let you know if it's still available.




 Perth Amboy Savings Institution
1968 Pocket Calendar and 2 Shoe Horns


Savings Institution Bank Envelope


From September 1968


Old Bridge, NJ

Friday, February 15, 2013

Weekend Historical Happenings: 2/16/13 - 2/17/13


WEEKEND HISTORICAL HAPPENINGS
Know about a historical event happening in your area? 
Send me an email to let us know!
Be the first to find out about these events on Facebook!


Saturday, February 16 - Piscataway, Middlesex County
John and Abigail Adams

In celebration of Valentine's Day, the Metlar-Bodine House Museum presents "John & Abigail Adams: A Love Story" on Saturday. Set against the backdrop of The American Revolution, political intrigue and the building of a new, fragile and fractious government, the enduring love and abiding friendship between John and Abigail Adams is one of the great love stories of American history.

Historian Glenn W. LeBoeuf, will talk about their courtship, marriage, family life and the friendship that persevered through many trials on February 16th, at 2pm (rescheduled from February 9th due to the snowstorm). Mr. LeBoeuf received his degree in history from Monmouth University, taught social studies for many years, and for over 25 years has been a sought-after lecturer for historical societies, civic groups, library associations and colleges. In addition, he was active in Civil War Reenacting, having participated in the films Glory and Gettysburg. He is a life-long resident of New Jersey.

Seating is limited. Reservations must be received by February 14th. Refreshments will be served after the program and the museum's gift shop will be open. Cost $15 per person. For reservations and directions, call 732-463-8363. The Metlar-Bodine House Museum is located at 1281 River Road, Piscataway, NJ.

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Saturdays, Feburary 16 - February 23 - Port Norris, Cumberland County
Winter Enrichment Series

A winter learning experience for ages 6 - 12 held each Saturday from 9:00 am - 12:00 noon at the Bivalve Shipping Sheds at 2800 High Street, Port Norris, NJ. Explore winter on the Delaware Bay: discover the bay's winter inhabitants and environment with hands on activities, wetland walks, critter observations, art and crafts. This program runs every Saturday until February 23. For more information or to register, contact Laura S. Johnson, ljohnson@bayshorediscovery.org; 856-785-2060 ext. 102. www.bayshorediscovery.org

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Saturday, February 16 - Westfield, Union County
Black Soldiers and Sailors in the Civil War

In celebration of Black History month and the nation's commemoration of the sesquicentennial of the Civil War, the Westfield Historical Society will be hosting an exhibit presented by Ethel M. Washington entitled "Union County - Black Soldiers and Sailors in the Civil War." On Saturday at 1:00 pm, an introductory gallery talk will be given by Ms. Washington to kick off the exhibit, which will run through March 2013. April 12, 2011 marked the beginning of the nation's four-year (2011-2015) commemoration of the sesquicentennial of the Civil War and the Emancipation of enslaved Americans. The exhibit will showcase people of African American descent (Blacks and Mulatttos) from the "West Fields" and surrounding Union county who were actively engaged in the Civil War and the fight for their freedom. On display are portraits of Union County Black and Mulatto soldiers and sailors that enlisted in the regiments of the United States Colored Troops (USCT), as well as in white regiments raised in Union County.

Ms. Washington has spent most of her career in various cultural institutions, including the Newark Museum, Montclair Art Museum and the Cooper-Hewitt, as well as the National Design Museum, and Smithsonian Institution in New York City. Ethel served for many years as commissioner on the Plainfield Cultural and Heritage Commission. She was involved in a one-year oral history project funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting in order to get oral histories from 1,750 African-American families which have since been archived in the Library of Congress. She is a trustee on several boards including founding Vice Chair of the New Jersey African-American Cultural Heritage Foundation, The Old First Historic Trust Board- First Presbyterian Church of Elizabeth, The New Jersey State Historical Records Advisory Board, and the Advocates for New Jersey History Board. Ethel currently serves as History Programs Coordinator, Union County Office of Cultural Heritage Affairs, Department of Parks and Community Renewal.

Space is limited for the gallery talk and early reservations are encouraged. For more information on this program or for reservations, please contact the Westfield Historical Society at 908-654-1794. This program will be held at the Reeve History and Cultural Resource Center, 314 Mountain Avenue Westfield, NJ. http://westfieldhistoricalsociety.artisteer.net/

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Saturday, Feburary 16 - Trenton, Mercer County
Trenton's Education Legacy

The Trenton Museum Society and the Trenton City Museum present a new exhibit entitled "Trenton's Educational Legacy: The New Lincoln School." The exhibit, curated by Elizabeth Carter Lacy, examines the relationship between the New Lincoln School under segregation and after and Trenton's black community between the years 1924 and 1946. It will be on display on the second floor of the Trenton City Museum at Ellarslie in Cadwalader Park from February 9 through May 25, 2013.

The exhibit's opening reception will be held on Saturday from 2:00 until 4:00 pm and is open to the public. New Lincoln School alumni and friends from the 1930s and 1940s as well as area history buffs will attend the opening. Located on North Montgomery Street, the New Lincoln School opened in 1924 as a segregated school for Trenton's "Negro" students. Containing both elementary and junior high schools, it consolidated students from several other schools in the city where African-American children were educated. Many graduates of New Lincoln School went on to distinguished careers in fields such as education, law, public service, medicine, sports and the fine and performing arts. Many more became the firsts to hold Municipal, County, and State jobs that were once not open to African-Americans. In later years, a few held significant positions in Trenton's private businesses.

In 1946, as a result of the Hedgepeth-Williams lawsuit, Trenton's schools were desegregated. Mr. Patton J. Hill, the African-American principal of New Lincoln School from 1933-1958, continued as principal in the newly desegregated school until his retirement. After desegregation, the junior high school was renamed Junior High School No. 5 and is now known as the Rivera School. The exhibit will cover the period from the opening of the New Lincoln School in 1924 until the end of segregation in 1946. The exhibit will address why there was a need for a state-of-the-art school to replace substandard schools serving African-Americans. It will also highlight the teachers, principals, curriculum, sports, and health services of the new school, photos of graduation classes, leaders of various professions who visited the school, and achievements of alumni.

The exhibit will also focus on the important relationship among the school, the black family, the black church, and the black community. It will highlight the role of the Reverend John A. White of Shiloh Baptist Church, 1904-1946, a quiet strength working through various organizations to link the races in Trenton for the good of all.

The exhibit has been guest curated by Elizabeth Carter Lacy, founder of the Bettwansuela Museum Collection. Mrs. Lacy is an alumnus of New Lincoln School and long-time teacher in the Trenton Public School system. She graduated from Cheyney State Teacher's College (now Cheyney University) with a Bachelor's degree in education, and received the Reading Teacher's certification from Trenton State Teachers College (now The College of New Jersey). She has received many honors from Cheyney University and from civic and educational organizations including the NAACP. She is also founder and curator of the Geraldine Carter-Bethel Library Museum at Shiloh Baptist Church in Trenton.

Refreshments will be served. For more information, contact the Trenton Museum Society at 609-989-1191 or tms@ellarslie.org. Ellarslie Mansion is located in Cadwalader Park in Trenton. www.ellarslie.org


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Saturday - Sunday, February 16 - 17 - Cape May, Cape May County
Weekend Events

Crafts and Antiques in Winter: The region's most sought-after antique dealers and craftspeople come together for a two-day show featuring an array of handmade items, country antiques, glassware, silver, furniture and more. Saturday and Sunday from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm at the Cape May Convention Hall, Beach Avenue in Cape May. Admission $2. Sponsored by the Mid-Atlantic Center for the Arts & Humanities (MAC). For more information or to purchase tickets, call 609-884-5404 or 800-275-4278 or visit www.capemaymac.org.

Ghosts of Cape May Trolley Tour: Take this spine-tingling, 45-minute evening trolley ride through the streets of Cape May with a guide who relates the paranormal findings of Ghost Writer Craig McManus. Offered Saturday at 7:30 pm and 8:30 pm and Sunday at 7:00 pm and 8:00 pm. Admission: $10 for adults, $7 for children (ages 3-12). Sponsored by the Mid-Atlantic Center for the Arts & Humanities (MAC). For more information, call 609-884-5404 or 800-275-4278 or visit www.capemaymac.org.

Panel Discussion on the Carriage House Gallery Exhibit: "Celebrating Community Service: Black Fraternal, Social and Civic Organizations of Cape May County." Join representatives from the Center for Community Arts (CCA) and the local community to discuss the current Carriage House Gallery exhibit, which explores the significance of black fraternal, social and civic organizations in African-American social life and focus on those relevant to Cape May County. Sunday at 4:00 pm. Co-sponsored by the Center for Community Arts (CCA) and the Mid-Atlantic Center for the Arts & Humanities (MAC). For more information, call 609-884-5404 or 800-275-4278 or visit www.capemaymac.org.

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Sunday, Feburary 17 - Park Ridge, Bergen County
Learn to Speak Antique

The Pascack Historical Society (PHS) hopes to expand the knowledge of amateur antique furniture fans when it presents the first of a series of displays and lectures called "How to Speak Antique" on Sunday from 1:00 - 4:00 pm, at its barrier free museum, 19 Ridge Avenue, Park Ridge. Free admission.

PHS Trustee Robert Mathez, an expert on the restoration and conservation of antique furniture, will speak at 1:30 pm. His presentation will focus on the techniques used to identify various "styles of furniture" from The Seventeenth Century ("Pilgrim Country"- 1630-1690) through Modern (1940-1970). A Westwood resident, Mathez is president of Robert Mathez Interiors, and the Curator of Furniture at the not-for-profit museum. Future lectures in the series with include furniture "forms" and "woods."

Visitors will be able to view six pieces of furniture that represents various styles and periods, including: "In the Style of the Seventeenth Century" ladderback chair a American Queen Anne Style tilt top candlestand, a Georgian Style washstand, a Federal Style "Fancy" chair, an American Empire Style washstand commode and a Victorian Style upholstered armchair.

Attendees will receive a complimentary copy of a brand new sixteen page antique furniture guide booklet, published by the Pascack Historical Society, highlighting the furniture on display and containing information about different periods of furniture styles. An in depth question and answer period will follow the talk. Attendees are encouraged to bring small pieces of furniture, or photographs of their personal furniture, for identification and discussion. No values or formal written appraisals will be given. Complimentary coffee and cake will be served. Children are welcome if accompanied by an adult. For further information, questions or directions call 201-573-0307 or visit www.pascackhistoricalsociety.org.

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Sunday, Feburary 17 - Burlington, Burlington County
Burlington County Trivia

Join the Burlington County Historian Joe Laufer on Sunday from 2:00 - 4:00 pm for "Burlington County Trivia." Learn about the fun facts and oddities that Joe Laufer has uncovered in his years of research on historical topics. Q and A and light refreshments follow the program.

The cost is $5 per person. The program will be held at the Corson Poley Center at the Burlington County Historical Society, 454 Lawrence Street, Burlington, NJ 08016. For more information please call 609-386-4773 or e-mail burlcohistsoc@verizon.net.

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Sunday, February 17 - Morristown, Morris County
From Masters to Manufacturers: The Silver Industry & Early American Life

On Sunday, Macculloch Hall Historical Museum welcomes museum member and decorative arts collector Ken Miller for a brief examination of the early silver industry in the Colonies and newly born United States, focused on the significant changes within this one craft. It was not just taste and technique that changed during this period, nor was the American political revolution the only upheaval -- in fact social and commercial life went through its own revolution during these years and can be witnessed through the stories of early America's silversmiths.

Ken Miller served as a Naval flight officer, and then pursued a career in finance before retiring in 2003. He is currently focused on volunteerism. He is a gubernatorial appointee to the Board of the New Jersey Historic Trust, serves as chair of Morristown New Jersey's Historic Preservation Commission, is a trustee and treasurer of the Theta Xi foundation, and treasurer of the Morristown Library Foundation and his local church. Ken's passion for history, architectural design, and the decorative arts have been expressed through collecting, study, and preservation. His collecting interest is focused on early American silver, maritime, and automotive related subjects. Ken is also actively working on the restoration of his National Historic Landmark residence.

Tickets for Sunday's program will go on sale at 1:00 pm on the day of the program, no advance sales. The presentation begins at 4:30 pm. House tours (regular admission applies) take place throughout the afternoon and the last tour leaves at 3:00 pm. The upstairs galleries will remain open until 4:30 pm, with the "A Fine Collection" exhibit closing at 3:00 pm in preparation for the program. Tickets to hear the speaker are Adults $8; Seniors & Students $6; Children 6 - 12 $4. Members and children under 5 are free. Speaker tickets include admission to take part in a house tour through the period rooms of the Museum for visitors who sign up for a tour during the afternoon. Visitors can also enjoy the upstairs gallery exhibit "Thomas Nast: President Maker and Campaign Breaker," with more than 20 examples of presidential campaign images from the late 19th century. The exhibit illustrates the six presidential campaigns from 1864 through 1884.

The museum is open to tour the house and view exhibits on Wednesdays, Thursdays and Sundays from 1:00 - 4:00 pm. Adults $8; Seniors & Students $6; Children 6 - 12 $4. Members and children under 5 are free. The last tickets for admission are sold at 3:00 pm. Call 973-538-2404 ext. 10 or visit www.maccullochhall.org. Macculloch Hall Historical Museum is located at 45 Macculloch Avenue, Morristown. 

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Sunday, February 17 - Morristown, Morris County
The Making of an American Icon

We remember George Washington as the father of our country and arguably the greatest American to ever live. On Sunday,  join a Park Ranger to discover the early years of Washington's life and see how he became the man Americans love and idealize. Programs at 1:30 pm, 2:30 pm and 3:30 pm at the Washington Headquarter's Msuseum located within Morristown National Historical Park. Cost: $4 per Adult. www.nps.gov/morr

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Sunday, February 17 - Farmingdale, Monmouth County
George Washington's Birthday Celebration

On Sunday, the Historic Village at Allaire kicks off its first event of the year with George Washington’s Birthday Celebration from 1:00 - 4:00 pm! Join the Allaire Villagers for a day of celebration! At 1:00 p.m., the villagers of James P. Allaire's Howell Iron Works Company invite you to join them in the Historic Chapel for an 1830s-style Patriotic and Commemorative service in honor of General Washington!

Featuring patriotic orations, speeches, and commemorative poetry of the period, the service pays tribute to the young nation's beloved first president. The service will be followed by a procession through the village led by the Howell Iron Works Militia. Upon arriving at Mr. Allaire's mansion, visitors may take a tour of the building and sample a piece of birthday cake in honor of George Washington.

This event is FREE. The Historic Village at Allaire is located in Allaire State Park at 4263 Atlantic Avenue, Farmingdale, New Jersey 07727. Call 732-919-3500 for more information or visit www.allairevillage.org.

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Sunday, February 17 - Bedminster, Somerset County
Open House

The Jacobus Vanderveer House will be open for tours from 10:00 am - 4:00 pm. The day will feature a reenactor of General Henry Knox, who will explain his role in the history of the American Revolution and the Pluckemin Academy. At 3:30 pm, there will be a presentation on the Pluckemin Cantonment and a preview of the Digital Virtual Cantonment. The cantonment was located where the Hills of Bedminster residential community is sited today. Dr. John Seidel and Dr. Stewart Bruce, professors at Washington College, are creating a virtual 3D model of the cantonment, which they will preview in this presentation. The Jacobus Vanderveer House is located at 955 Route 202/206 South, Bedminster, NJ 07921. For more information visit www.jvanderveerhouse.com.

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Sundays through April 14, 2013 - Cranbury, Middlesex County
Bunting Doll House on Display

The Bunting Doll House is on display at the Cranbury Museum on Sundays from 1:00 - 4:00 pm  through April 14, 2013. The house is a hand-made replica of an 1890's house and veterinarian's office in Burlington, N.J. When Lavada Bunting needed to relax after her long days as a private duty nurse in the 1950s, she turned to an all-consuming hobby, creating a dollhouse and the miniature furniture for it. The endeavor was nine years in the making. Thanks to Lavada Bunting's efforts, her descendants have a family heirloom: an elaborately furnished, nine-room, two-story replica of a Colonial house. The creator's nephew Bill Bunting, a Cranbury resident and Princeton lawyer, said, "It's an idealized version of the house in Burlington, NJ where my aunt grew up. No one has ever played with it.  It's not that kind of house." He has loaned the Cranbury Historical and Preservation Society this family treasure. The Cranbury Museum is located at 4 Park Place East, Cranbury. www.cranburyhistory.org

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Through April 28, 2013 - Paterson, Passaic County
New Exhibit at Lambert Castle

Lambert Castle, the Victorian-era mansion located on the Garrett Mountain Reservation on the border between Paterson and Clifton, will be home to an exciting new art exhibit now through April 28, 2013. The exhibit, entitled "Message in a Bottle: The Bottleworks of Dr. Etta Ehrlich," will feature Dr. Ehrlich's unique and thought-provoking take on society and culture, using carefully-arranged antique bottles and other found objects. The exhibit will be open until April 28 during regular museum hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 1:00 to 4:00 pm. Lambert Castle is located at 3 Valley Road, Paterson. For more information, call 973-247-0085 or visit www.lambertcastle.org.

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Some event listings courtesy of the League of Historical Societies of New Jersey